Career Change

With the right tools, a solid plan of action, and plenty of motivation, anyone can change careers. Discover all the resources you need to achieve your career goals here.

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Career Change

What should you consider before making a career change?
Is it possible to switch careers without going back to school?
Which tech career path is right for you?
Landing a job in your new field
Getting started with your career change

What should you consider before making a career change?

Changing careers is both exciting and daunting in equal measure, and there are certain things you’ll want to consider before you take the leap. First and foremost, it’s important to distinguish between needing a new job and wanting a completely new career. If you essentially enjoy what you do but need a change of scenery, or want to work for a company that aligns more closely with your values, you may just need a new job. However, if you find that your career doesn’t tap into your natural talents and interests, and generally leaves you feeling unfulfilled, a career change might be in order. If you’re unsure, check out these ten signs it’s time for a career change and see how many resonate with you.

Once you’ve established that you are indeed ready for a career change, you’ll need to start making plans. Perhaps you’ve already got your heart set on a particular career path, in which case you can start considering the logistics. If not, you’ll need to spend some time thinking about your goals. Essentially, what core values, intrinsic motivators, and general interests do you want your new career to tap into? What will you get from your new career that you’re currently lacking?

Finally, you’ll want to come up with a plan of action. At this stage, it’s important to think about how you’ll go about learning new skills, as well as the amount of time and money you can realistically invest in your career change. How will it fit around your current schedule? Do you have a timeline you want to aim for? For further tips and advice, take a look at this guide on how to prepare for a major career change

Is it possible to switch careers without going back to school?

As a potential career-changer, you might be wondering: Is it possible to break into a new field without going back to school? And, in particular, what qualifications do you need to start a career in tech? 

Forging a new career will require you to not only learn new skills, but also to apply your existing skills in new ways. Fortunately, you don’t need a university degree to retrain as a designer, developer, or data analyst. The tech industry is extremely hands-on, and employers are more interested in what you can do—as demonstrated by a strong portfolio—than in your “paper qualifications”. So what are your options apart from going back to school in the traditional sense?

An increasingly popular route into the field is through bootcamps and online programs. With their focus on practical skills, real-world application, job preparation, and portfolio building, bootcamps are a highly effective way to build up your skillset and train for the tech industry. At the same time, they tend to be more flexible and affordable than traditional university degrees, making them much more accessible. 

Not only are online bootcamps an effective way to learn new skills; they’re held in high regard by employers, too. According to one recent report, one in three managers hired web developers who had graduated from a coding bootcamp. This is echoed across the tech industry in general, with employers keen to hire driven, highly motivated self-starters who have taken the initiative to learn new skills and, most importantly, know how to apply them.  

In short, it is entirely possible to switch careers without going back to school—as long as you train with a reputable provider and have the portfolio to show for it. You can learn more about breaking into tech without a degree here.

Which tech career path is right for you?

The first step in your career-change journey is to determine which new path you want to pursue. Tech is, without doubt, one of the most exciting industries to be part of—with myriad domains and job titles. Among the most sought-after professionals are UX designers, UI designers, web developers, and data analysts, and you’ll find plenty of opportunity for variety, career growth, and impactful work within these four areas. But how do you figure out which of these career paths is the best fit?

Start by doing your research and understanding what each role entails. Where do designers, developers, and data analysts sit within the broader business context? What kinds of tasks can you expect on a day-to-day basis? What hard and soft skills are required for each role? The better you understand the specifics of each role, the better equipped you’ll be to make a decision. And, as you do your research, you’ll likely start to lean towards a particular path. 

It’s also useful to reflect on your own interests and qualities. If you have an affinity for numbers, you might find yourself drawn to data analytics. If you consider yourself the creative type, you’ll probably find the prospect of working in UX or UI design most exciting. Perhaps you’re a problem-solver at heart, and find that the role of the web developer taps into that. Essentially, it’s all about doing your research and finding the career path that resonates with your own areas of interest and career aspirations. You’ll find a comprehensive overview of each career path, together with advice on how to find the best fit for you, in this guide: Which tech career path is right for you? A guide to four of the most rewarding jobs in tech right now.

 

Landing a job in your new field

When it comes to changing careers, learning the necessary skills is just the beginning. To land your first job in tech, you’ll need a professional portfolio, a solid job-search strategy, and a strong personal brand. Don’t worry, it’s not as exhausting as it sounds—and a good quality bootcamp will help you with all of these things.

Your portfolio is essentially your golden ticket into the world of tech. Whether you’re a designer, developer, or data analyst, your portfolio should showcase how you work, how you approach challenges and solve problems, and the kinds of end results you can produce. In an industry that focuses so heavily on practical skills, your portfolio shows employers not only what you know, but how you apply it. It’s also an opportunity to convey your passion for the field—for example, by featuring any hobby or volunteer projects you’ve worked on. 

At the same time, it’s important to market yourself in a way that highlights both your newfound skills and the value you bring from your previous career. There’s no need to discard what you were doing before; even if it seems completely unrelated, there are plenty of transferable skills you can (and should) highlight. For example, if you previously worked in teaching, you’ll be excellent at understanding and catering to diverse user needs—a skill that will serve you well as a UX designer. Before you apply for jobs, you’ll want to build your personal brand and optimize your online profiles. This is something a dedicated career specialist can help you with. 

Getting started with your career change

If you’re ready to set your career change in motion, the first step is to find a reputable program or bootcamp. When choosing a bootcamp, it’s important to consider your budget, your preferred learning style (e.g. full-time or part-time, flexibly or with a set timetable), as well as what’s included in the curriculum. Ideally, you’ll opt for a program that offers hands-on learning, dedicated mentorship, and expert career coaching—all the things you need to kick-start your new career. If you’re not sure where to start, these guides will help:

At the same time, continue to read up on your chosen field as much as possible. Immerse yourself in theory, real-world case studies, trends, and discussion topics—anything that serves to deepen your understanding of your new industry. Finally, be prepared for some of the obstacles you might face as a career changer (and tackle them head-on!) with this guide on the challenges of being an adult learner (and how to overcome them).

Keen for a hands-on introduction to some of the most rewarding fields in tech?

 

What should you consider before making a career change?

Changing careers is both exciting and daunting in equal measure, and there are certain things you’ll want to consider before you take the leap. First and foremost, it’s important to distinguish between needing a new job and wanting a completely new career. If you essentially enjoy what you do but need a change of scenery, or want to work for a company that aligns more closely with your values, you may just need a new job. However, if you find that your career doesn’t tap into your natural talents and interests, and generally leaves you feeling unfulfilled, a career change might be in order. If you’re unsure, check out these ten signs it’s time for a career change and see how many resonate with you.

Once you’ve established that you are indeed ready for a career change, you’ll need to start making plans. Perhaps you’ve already got your heart set on a particular career path, in which case you can start considering the logistics. If not, you’ll need to spend some time thinking about your goals. Essentially, what core values, intrinsic motivators, and general interests do you want your new career to tap into? What will you get from your new career that you’re currently lacking?

Finally, you’ll want to come up with a plan of action. At this stage, it’s important to think about how you’ll go about learning new skills, as well as the amount of time and money you can realistically invest in your career change. How will it fit around your current schedule? Do you have a timeline you want to aim for? For further tips and advice, take a look at this guide on how to prepare for a major career change

Is it possible to switch careers without going back to school?

As a potential career-changer, you might be wondering: Is it possible to break into a new field without going back to school? And, in particular, what qualifications do you need to start a career in tech? 

Forging a new career will require you to not only learn new skills, but also to apply your existing skills in new ways. Fortunately, you don’t need a university degree to retrain as a designer, developer, or data analyst. The tech industry is extremely hands-on, and employers are more interested in what you can do—as demonstrated by a strong portfolio—than in your “paper qualifications”. So what are your options apart from going back to school in the traditional sense?

An increasingly popular route into the field is through bootcamps and online programs. With their focus on practical skills, real-world application, job preparation, and portfolio building, bootcamps are a highly effective way to build up your skillset and train for the tech industry. At the same time, they tend to be more flexible and affordable than traditional university degrees, making them much more accessible. 

Not only are online bootcamps an effective way to learn new skills; they’re held in high regard by employers, too. According to one recent report, one in three managers hired web developers who had graduated from a coding bootcamp. This is echoed across the tech industry in general, with employers keen to hire driven, highly motivated self-starters who have taken the initiative to learn new skills and, most importantly, know how to apply them.  

In short, it is entirely possible to switch careers without going back to school—as long as you train with a reputable provider and have the portfolio to show for it. You can learn more about breaking into tech without a degree here.

Which tech career path is right for you?

The first step in your career-change journey is to determine which new path you want to pursue. Tech is, without doubt, one of the most exciting industries to be part of—with myriad domains and job titles. Among the most sought-after professionals are UX designers, UI designers, web developers, and data analysts, and you’ll find plenty of opportunity for variety, career growth, and impactful work within these four areas. But how do you figure out which of these career paths is the best fit?

Start by doing your research and understanding what each role entails. Where do designers, developers, and data analysts sit within the broader business context? What kinds of tasks can you expect on a day-to-day basis? What hard and soft skills are required for each role? The better you understand the specifics of each role, the better equipped you’ll be to make a decision. And, as you do your research, you’ll likely start to lean towards a particular path. 

It’s also useful to reflect on your own interests and qualities. If you have an affinity for numbers, you might find yourself drawn to data analytics. If you consider yourself the creative type, you’ll probably find the prospect of working in UX or UI design most exciting. Perhaps you’re a problem-solver at heart, and find that the role of the web developer taps into that. Essentially, it’s all about doing your research and finding the career path that resonates with your own areas of interest and career aspirations. You’ll find a comprehensive overview of each career path, together with advice on how to find the best fit for you, in this guide: Which tech career path is right for you? A guide to four of the most rewarding jobs in tech right now.

 

Landing a job in your new field

When it comes to changing careers, learning the necessary skills is just the beginning. To land your first job in tech, you’ll need a professional portfolio, a solid job-search strategy, and a strong personal brand. Don’t worry, it’s not as exhausting as it sounds—and a good quality bootcamp will help you with all of these things.

Your portfolio is essentially your golden ticket into the world of tech. Whether you’re a designer, developer, or data analyst, your portfolio should showcase how you work, how you approach challenges and solve problems, and the kinds of end results you can produce. In an industry that focuses so heavily on practical skills, your portfolio shows employers not only what you know, but how you apply it. It’s also an opportunity to convey your passion for the field—for example, by featuring any hobby or volunteer projects you’ve worked on. 

At the same time, it’s important to market yourself in a way that highlights both your newfound skills and the value you bring from your previous career. There’s no need to discard what you were doing before; even if it seems completely unrelated, there are plenty of transferable skills you can (and should) highlight. For example, if you previously worked in teaching, you’ll be excellent at understanding and catering to diverse user needs—a skill that will serve you well as a UX designer. Before you apply for jobs, you’ll want to build your personal brand and optimize your online profiles. This is something a dedicated career specialist can help you with. 

Getting started with your career change

If you’re ready to set your career change in motion, the first step is to find a reputable program or bootcamp. When choosing a bootcamp, it’s important to consider your budget, your preferred learning style (e.g. full-time or part-time, flexibly or with a set timetable), as well as what’s included in the curriculum. Ideally, you’ll opt for a program that offers hands-on learning, dedicated mentorship, and expert career coaching—all the things you need to kick-start your new career. If you’re not sure where to start, these guides will help:

At the same time, continue to read up on your chosen field as much as possible. Immerse yourself in theory, real-world case studies, trends, and discussion topics—anything that serves to deepen your understanding of your new industry. Finally, be prepared for some of the obstacles you might face as a career changer (and tackle them head-on!) with this guide on the challenges of being an adult learner (and how to overcome them).

Keen for a hands-on introduction to some of the most rewarding fields in tech?

 

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